Millennials

  • We know each generation is unique, and that doesn’t change when it comes to money management. Technology changes, the economy changes and attitudes change. It makes sense, then, that Generation X (ages 35-50) and Millennials (ages 18-34) sometimes think differently about finances. Here are some trends we’ve seen with these two younger generations.

  • After every national election cycle, the world of financial planning changes in some way. It may be big changes coming down the pike, or changes in the details. Advisors work to field through the changes to make sure clients are getting the best advice they can offer. This election cycle is no different and looks to have big changes coming your way. The first area targeted for change is the Healthcare Law. With reference to Health Savings Accounts being proposed as a significant component, it may help to refresh our memories on what these are and how they’re used.  

    Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) were introduced in 2004 and were coupled with High Deductible Health Plans (HDHPs).  It’s always important to verify that the insurance plan is HSA-eligible. The HSA is a separate account that an employee, employer or private policy holder contributes money to during the year. The premise of these accounts was to help curb the growing cost of health insurance and to put the insured patient more in control of their healthcare. The pre-tax contributions are much like a traditional 401(k) or IRA. The account can then be tapped to pay for qualified medical expenses. If money is used to pay for non-qualified medical expenses, it will be taxed and will include a 10% penalty.

  • In our previous article, we reviewed five tips that parents could teach kids on being ethically responsible with money. This week, we’ll continue our financial education discussion with how we can teach kids about budgeting and saving from an early age.  

    How many of us wish we were taught more about money during our childhood? One of the best ways to help our kids avoid financial mistakes in the future is to teach them to manage money.

    According to an EverFi, Inc recentsurvey, “More than a quarter of students believe they will be unprepared to manage their finances upon high school graduation. In addition, students surveyed demonstrated that they do not understand basic financial facts and concepts.” Teaching kids basic financial tasks like developing and sticking to a budget will result in strong habits that they can carry into the future. So, now the question is, what financial skills do you teach them? Well, it really depends on how old they are.

  • In order to make a living wage today in the U.S., employees are required to have at least a four-year degree. At the same time, the cost of tuition has been on a continuous rise. So for generations X and beyond, student loan debt makes up a large chunk of their total debt. Four short years at college could potentially take decades to pay off if you’re just making minimum payments.

    There is hope, however. There are options to pay off debt quickly, get lower interest rates or in some cases, have the debt forgiven. Here are some of your options to chip away at student loan debt so that you can have a little more breathing room in your budget.

  • Years ago, in many junior and senior high schools, our youth attended classes about basic budgeting and finances. And often, the only classes were part of a Home Economics track as Life Skills. Sadly, along came budget cuts, and these classes were removed. During my career, I have spent some time in classrooms as a guest teacher, sharing insights and tips for students to become more financially savvy.

  • Thinking about purchasing a home but worried you can’t afford it due to student loans? You aren’t alone. According to a study by American Student Assistance, “55 percent of student loan holders said their debt is causing them to put off homeownership.” Most of them believe their student debts would make purchasing a home impossible. The reality, however, is that owning a home is possible even with student debt. Here are some tips on how to purchase a home while still paying off student loans.

  • Millennials are the next generation entering and rising through the ranks of the workforce. Their needs, however, differ distinctly from the Baby Boomer generation that preceded them. In a general sense, millennials are not focused on attaining the same types of goals as their predecessors, namely expensive houses, and cars. Rather, their priorities lie in spending money on experiences, travel, and personal development.

    Financial advisors need to be aware of the shifting needs of their millennial clientele and actively think about ways to better help them reach their goals.

  • The retirement savings gap is growing at an alarming rate. Many millennials are overwhelmed with student loans, consumer debt, and historically low pay. Unfortunately, this often means that retirement savings gets put on the back burner while other financial goals and dreams take up the spotlight. To combat this, and to help their younger employees prepare for retirement, many companies have started to implement an opt-out workplace retirement plan.

  • So, how many of you have run into the following issues? You established a money jar system for your kids to learn how to budget their allowance — only to realize you never remember to get cash out of the bank (because who uses cash these days?). You sit down to discuss financial responsibility and savings only to find them bored and itching to get back to playing Roblox or Minecraft on their device. If this sounds familiar, you’re not alone. So why not give the old school piggy-bank system a digital upgrade. Use an app to teach your child about financial responsibility.

  • The holiday season is here, and, while it’s important to give thanks and spread holiday cheer, it’s also important to be mindful of your budget and savings. This is particularly important if you are a young adult still adjusting to living on your own, paying off bills and student loans, and earning an entry-level salary. Not sure where to start? No worries, below are some key money management tips to keep you on track during the holiday season and throughout the new year.

  • In my series on youth and finances, I try to share many ways to give young adults tools to make sure they keep their financial life as stable as they can while navigating high school, leaving home for University and, eventually, their first career building job choices. However, for many students, personal financial stability has never been a reality, even if they have come from a family with that stability. There are many reasons for this, but the most prevalent is lack of education.  

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