Finance Made Simple

Most people are working toward creating an estate plan that aligns their money with what they value most in this world. They want to take care of their families, donate money to charities and causes they care deeply about, and support parts of their community they love. What many people don’t realize is that you don’t have to wait until you set up your estate plan to use your money in a meaningful way. Socially responsible investing, or SRI, can help you to invest in companies or organizations that are doing good work in the world - all while still keeping you on track to reach your financial goals.

When you’re in a committed relationship, you’re going to experience disagreements. When those disagreements are about finances, it can be especially uncomfortable because we all have emotional hang ups when it comes to money. Whether one of you is a spender and the other is a saver, or you disagree about where your “extra” money from bonuses or unexpected cash windfalls should go, financial disagreements can lead to tension in your relationship. Luckily, you can move through these difficult conversations with relative ease by following a few simple steps.

Many women run their households, have built successful careers, tackle a side hustle, and are actively involved with their family, friends, and local community. It’s not a secret that women are essentially superheroes without capes! So why is it that so many women struggle to discuss their finances? According to a recent survey, 61% of women would rather discuss the details of their death than their own money. That’s a daunting statistic, especially because many women will be solely responsible for their own finances, and potentially their family’s estate, at some point during their lives.

When you work with a financial advisor, you want to make sure that the advice you receive is always in your best interest. You don’t want to jeopardize your financial plan, or your ability to earn more in the long-term because an advisor sold you a financial product that you may or may not have needed.

For many, retirement can be a challenging time. Going from your set routine and schedule to having a dramatic lack of structure in your life is jarring. Though many people have a vision for how they’d like their retirement to look, others might find that pursuing a secondary “retirement career” is the answer they’re looking for.

Much of financial planning involves preparing for the unpleasant and unexpected. Almost half of United States couples go through a divorce at some point in their lives - and it’s a difficult process both financially and emotionally. Although money may be one of the last things on your mind right now, there are a few steps to take that can help you to line up your finances when divorce is imminent, and after you go through proceedings.

If you’re a single woman without children, you may be wondering whether estate planning is something you need to be concerned about. The truth is, estate planning is something that everyone should consider, at least to some extent. When putting together your estate plan, there are two key things you need to consider:

  1. Who is going to take care of your assets when you are no longer able to do so?
  2. Who will make health related decisions if you’re unable to make them for yourself?

Life expectancy is still steadily increasing, with no signs of slowing down. Women, in particular, have seen an extending lifespan in recent years. Right now, women have an average lifespan of 81 years! As biotechnology improves, it’s very likely that people will live well into their 90’s - or even past 100 years of age. While this is an exciting thought, it does require more detailed financial planning.

The beautiful thing about retiring in today’s world is that there are no traditional expectations. As women, we are presented with countless, incredible retirement lifestyle options.

Whether you yourself are currently experiencing widowhood, or you know someone who is - I want to take a moment to acknowledge your strength. When you lose a lifelong partner, there are moments where it might feel numb, as though moving forward and creating a next-steps plan is outside of your capacity. That’s completely understandable.

Three generations of women

In most cases, there’s a motivator beyond ourselves that keeps us on track to achieve financial success: our family. We want to make sure our spouse or partner, parents, kids, and grandkids are well taken care of. More than that, we want them to experience the financial freedom to chase their goals, and to achieve big, exciting things with their lives.

You might even have an estate plan in place that provides generously for your kids, grandkids, or great grandkids. But you know what they say about best laid plans of mice and men.

Thinking about purchasing a home but worried you can’t afford it due to student loans? You aren’t alone. According to a study by American Student Assistance, “55 percent of student loan holders said their debt is causing them to put off homeownership.” Most of them believe their student debts would make purchasing a home impossible. The reality, however, is that owning a home is possible even with student debt. Here are some tips on how to purchase a home while still paying off student loans.

Do the following words have you holding your head in fear and confusion - Recession, Depression, Bubbles, Bull and Bear Markets? Do you wonder when morning shows use them whether you should be celebrating or stuffing your money into a mattress? If so, you’re not alone. It can all be a bit bewildering. Good news is, we’re here to help. Let’s discuss the history and definition behind all these terms and what they mean for you.

Buy low and sell high. It’s pretty simple. The problem is knowing what’s low and what’s high.” - Jim Rogers, Chairman of Rogers Holdings and Beeland Interests, Inc.

Buy low, sell high, four words that make the idea of investing in the stock market seem exciting and simple. The reality, however, can be overwhelming and frustrating, particularly if your investments aren’t performing as well as you expected in the markets. Maybe you heard the latest buzz about a new and upcoming technology that had you jumping at the chance to be a part of the action – only to realize later that you purchased high and now their stock price is dropping. You’re not alone.

Blackrock reports, “The average investor, over a 20-year span ending in 2015, underperformed the S&P 500 by six percent.”

Below are a few key reasons that uninformed investors don’t make more money in the stock markets.

Subcategories

Get New Posts Emailed to You!
*required
 

Finance Made Simple

Contact Wood Smith Advisors

(703) 753-8222

Email